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Daily Archives: August 22, 2005

7.30 Report: The Mine and the Islamists

Well, that is quite a story on tonight’s 7.30 Report about The Mine and the weird Islamic fundamentalists. It is worth revisiting my diary for July 28 2005, July 27 2005 and July 26 2005. There were many earliier entries on Diary-X referring to the Islamic Student Forum in 2003, but they sadly have gone. There have been two forums since, but I did not attend them. My friend the Mufti of Watson’s Bay was one of the speakers at the first and second ones, and in fact told the students in no uncertain terms before the second one to make sure no “total crap” was handed out. The bulk of the sessions was reasonable, or where fundie/conservative (not the Mufti, that’s for sure!) it was sadly like Christian and Jewish glazed-eye literalists, the usual “I have a hotline to God” routine, you know: “The Book says, and it’s true because the Book says it’s true and when the Book says it is true it is true because the Book says it’s true because it is a True Book etc — in eternal circularity…” Mister Tariq, the principal fundie at the seminar, seemed to take everything literally and regarded Abraham, for example, as his best mate and as real and as knowable as John Howard. He also had this line where covering your wife (as in hijab) was cool because she was a precious possession, and just as you’d cover your Porsche if you had one… (Mind you, head scarves don’t offend me in the least if that’s what the wearers want to do; they even look rather nice quite often.)

All of which is sad, and the Khilafah mob are crazy as cut snakes in many respects. The argument on The 7.30 Report last night went thus:
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Posted by on August 22, 2005 in Australia and Australian, education, faith and philosophy, fundamentalism and extremism, Islam, Multicultural

 

About the St Matthias Churches

It is of course a recognised ploy, with the sincerest good reasons like stopping young persons from going to Hell, that fundamentalists and literalists target adolescents. Even the Pope is at it. The Mine Christian group and the protestant classes in non-compulsory Scripture — not to mention the University of NSW — have long been captured by the keen young things from The Church of the Holy Jensens, advocating “divine inspiration and infallibility of Holy Scripture, as originally given, and its supreme authority in all matters of faith and conduct.”

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Posted by on August 22, 2005 in Australia and Australian, Bible, Christianity, faith and philosophy, fundamentalism and extremism, local, Salt Mine

 

David Lange Speech on Tolerance: Otago University Thursday 5 August 2004

It is healthy to turn to this speech last year by the late David Lange, former PM of New Zealand (Sirdan met him, by the way), especially in the light of John Howard’s announced receipt of the Woodrow Wilson award, and Peter Costello’s comments on anti-American teachers.

Although I was asked here to talk about peace, I am not what could be called a pacifist. I think that, like individuals, societies and nations have the right to defend themselves from attack. I think for example that the government of Kuwait was entitled to call for military assistance when it was invaded by Iraq in 1990. I think that this country, New Zealand, was right to identify itself with the victims of aggression as it did in 1939 when it declared war on Germany.

I am just as sure that there must be limits on the use of force. The use of force can only be justified if it is in proportion to the threat which is offered. Tomorrow is the anniversary of an attack which in my mind cannot be justified, and that is the bombing of Hiroshima. Like the bombing of Nagasaki, it was done to make a point, and the harm done was out of all proportion to the threat.

I see no justification for the terrorist attacks of September 2001. They are a crime against humanity. The Bali bombing was no less an outrage. There is no justification for the murder of the innocent.

The government of the United States, and the government of Indonesia, had a duty to pursue the people who were responsible for these terrorist crimes. The Indonesian government has had some success in bringing the murderers to account. The Americans had a harder task.

It is the American response I am going to talk about tonight.

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Posted by on August 22, 2005 in culture wars, current affairs, events, human rights, Iraq, Oceania, peace, Political, Sirdan, terrorism