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How the NSW government has made World Youth Day into a problem

04 Jul

There was a talkback session on ABC Local’s Night Life last night about the upcoming Papal visit and the NSW special laws so quietly foisted on us recently. Arthur covers those laws here from his point of view:

The Australian and international blogosphere is abuzz with news of New South Wales’ antidemocratic laws protecting Catholicism from criticism during the World Youth Day festivities:

EXTRAORDINARY new powers will allow police to arrest and fine people for “causing annoyance” to World Youth Day participants and permit partial strip searches at hundreds of Sydney sites, beginning today.

The laws, which operate until the end of July, have the potential to make a crime of wearing a T-shirt with a message on it, undertaking a Chaser-style stunt, handing out condoms at protests, riding a skateboard or even playing music, critics say.

Police and volunteers from the State Emergency Service and Rural Fire Service will be able to direct people to cease engaging in conduct that “causes annoyance or inconvenience to participants in a World Youth Day event”.

People who fail to comply will be subject to a $5500 fine.

You may find a very amusing range of T-shirts that have appeared as a result in Arthur’s post.

My own feeling is that prior to the NSW government’s heavy-handed and authoritarian action most people here accepted, whether with or without enthusiasm, that World Youth Day is indeed a major event of note and thus accepted that it would lead to inconvenience. However, most Sydney-siders really were not all that interested, and very few would have bothered to go out demonstrating one way or another.

Now, however, the government has so incensed people, including many prominent Catholics, that demonstrations and protests are far more likely than they would otherwise have been.

Given that current laws governing such events were, according to many commentators, quite sufficient to deal with any really bad examples of disruption to the event, the NSW government has been very foolish to have foreshadowed issues that probably would not have arisen.

If it does go pear-shaped, they need only look in the mirror to find the guilty party.

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6 responses to “How the NSW government has made World Youth Day into a problem

  1. arthurvandelay

    July 4, 2008 at 2:27 pm

    Now, however, the government has so incensed people, including many prominent Catholics, that demonstrations and protests are far more likely than they would otherwise have been.

    I think there’s a parallel to be drawn between the inevitable anti-WYD demonstrations and the Anonymous movement. Not because Catholics are in any way like Scientologists (though maybe a case can be made for the Vatican hierarchy vs. the COS hierarchy), but because people these days are less welcoming of such blatant attacks on their freedoms. I wonder if Anonymous will make an appearance in Sydney?

     
  2. ninglun

    July 4, 2008 at 3:48 pm

    See also Ecstathy, and thanks for the reference. 🙂

     
  3. ninglun

    July 16, 2008 at 11:38 am

    See Court backs WYD activists’ right to annoy – News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation).

    From what you may read at the end there, condom distribution may be no bad thing…

     
  4. Sueblimely

    July 19, 2008 at 5:22 am

    I can’t believe what I just read. I do not want to believe it. An Aussie government would not ban such things. Nah you must be talking of the US here.

    Are there any protests about the Youth Day protest laws and the public annoyance caused by them?

     
  5. ninglun

    July 19, 2008 at 9:16 am

    As you will see in the previous comment, the Federal Court overturned that law.

     
 
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