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God’s Politics – Jim Wallis on Kevin Rudd

05 Aug

How others see us, I guess you may say. A Prime Minister’s Preferential Option for the Poor, and the Planet (by Jim Wallis) just popped up in the feed in my side bar; I was intrigued. You may be too.

We sat for several hours at a lovely outdoor restaurant up in Cairns, the tropical northeast corner of the country. Security was certainly much lighter than a similar meeting with a U.S. president is, and I enjoyed how ordinary people would come up with their children to meet the prime minister. Every time, the Australian head of state would extend his hand and a warm smile to say “Hi, I’m Kevin.” Very nice indeed.

Yes, I know: Kevin Rudd is not our head of state. That honour goes to the Queen/Governor-General. But still, I do like the imagery there… Excites my Aussie patriotism almost as much as an Olympic gold medal would — well, more, actually…

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4 responses to “God’s Politics – Jim Wallis on Kevin Rudd

  1. AV

    August 6, 2008 at 12:27 am

    I have written about Kevin as a new-style Labor political leader who talks openly about his faith in a secular country.

    Politicians talking openly about their faith in Australia is by no means a new phenomenon, even among Labor leaders.

    Rudd’s masterstroke was perhaps to get Australian Christian voters to consider those aspects of Christian doctrine that a Tony Abbott, Fred Nile or Jim Wallace would rather they didn’t think about: i.e. aspects of the doctrine that bear on poverty, industrial relations, the environment and so on.

     
  2. Neil

    August 6, 2008 at 12:37 am

    Rudd’s masterstroke was perhaps to get Australian Christian voters to consider those aspects of Christian doctrine that a Tony Abbott, Fred Nile or Jim Wallace would rather they didn’t think about: i.e. aspects of the doctrine that bear on poverty, industrial relations, the environment and so on. Which is why Jim Wallis likes him so much, of course, as those are the aspects of the doctrine he is promoting.

    I wouldn’t disagree with what you’ve said, AV.

    I, as you will see, was drawn to what Wallis as an American noted about the informality and lower key security. I like that too. There were times when (former) NSW Premier Bob Carr used to have a coffee at the Juice and Java downstairs, and again there weren’t a whole host of suits with suspicious bulges in the jackets and things in their ears… Yes, he did have a minder though…

    Still, I really appreciate the way we do things sometimes. Don’t you?

     
  3. arthurvandelay

    August 6, 2008 at 8:13 pm

    Still, I really appreciate the way we do things sometimes. Don’t you?

    In all fairness, Australia does not have the same kind of history of political assassinations as the US.

     
  4. Neil

    August 6, 2008 at 9:16 pm

    We are somewhat backward in that area, aren’t we? Compare List of assassinated people — one of those wonderful lists on Wikipedia.

    The Japanese have kept their end up in this field, haven’t they? Even if the list goes back to 592 AD…

    So we have only had two, one kind of disputed right now, and the other on Norfolk Island. Of course Peter Kocan did have a go in his youth at Opposition Leader Arthur Calwell… And some Fenian had a go at Alfred, Duke of Edinburgh in the 19th century, and a crazed Korean lunged at Prince Charles in 1988, if I recall correctly. But yes, our record is not world class.

     
 
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