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Daily Archives: October 30, 2008

Buddha in East Redfern

I spotted this high up on a South Dowling Street balcony. It was almost beyond the Casio’s range. I had to rest the camera on something solid, and then do a bit of work afterwards on the image.

mon27 033a

Original photo by Neil 27 Oct 2008

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Posted by on October 30, 2008 in local, personal

 

A quick portrait of Surry Hills 2010

The 2006 Census Quickstats reveals:

  1. In the 2006 Census (held on 8th August 2006), there were 15,036 persons usually resident in Surry Hills (Suburb): 59.5% were males and 40.5% were females. Of the total population in Surry Hills (Suburb) 0.8% were Indigenous persons, compared with 2.3% Indigenous persons in Australia.
  2. 4.7% of the population usually resident in Surry Hills (Suburb) were children aged between 0-14 years, and 15.5% were persons aged 55 years and over. The median age of persons in Surry Hills (Suburb) was 33 years, compared with 37 years for persons in Australia.
  3. 55.7% of persons usually resident in Surry Hills (Suburb) were Australian citizens, 34.4% were born overseas and 3.8% were overseas visitors. The national average for “born overseas” is 22.2%.
  4. 39.9% of persons usually resident in Surry Hills (Suburb) stated they were born in Australia. Other common responses within Surry Hills (Suburb) were: England 5.2%, New Zealand 3.9%, China 2.9%, Thailand 1.5% and Korea, Republic of 1.2%. Nationally, 70.9% say they were born in Australia, 4.3% England, and 2%  New Zealand. We’re being swamped by Poms and Kiwis!
  5. English was stated as the only language spoken at home by 54.2% of persons usually resident in Surry Hills (Suburb). The most common languages other than English spoken at home were: Cantonese 2.8%, Mandarin 2.1%, Thai 1.4%, Greek 1.2% and Korean 1.1%.
  6. The most common responses for religious affiliation for persons usually resident in Surry Hills (Suburb) were No Religion 25.7%, Catholic 17.3%, Anglican 9.1%, Buddhism 4.9% and Eastern Orthodox 2.2%. Nationally 18.7% offer “no religion”. We’re being swamped by atheists!
  7. 18.5% of persons aged 15 years and over usually resident in Surry Hills (Suburb) were married, 67.7% never married, 10.5% separated or divorced and 3.3% widowed. Nationally 49.6% are married. I will leave you to imagine who we are being swamped by there…
  8. 8,348 people aged 15 years and over who were usually resident in Surry Hills (Suburb) were in the labour force. Of these, 70.9% were employed full-time, 20.1% were employed part-time, 2.9% were employed but away from work, 1.3% were employed but did not state their hours worked and 4.8% were unemployed. There were 2,419 usual residents aged 15 years and over not in the labour force.
  9. The most common responses for occupation for employed persons usually resident in Surry Hills (Suburb) were Professionals 39.6%, Managers 16.3%, Clerical and Administrative Workers 13.4%, Community and Personal Service Workers 8.6% and Sales Workers 7.5%.
  10. The most common industries of employment for persons aged 15 years and over usually resident in Surry Hills (Suburb) were Cafes, Restaurants and Takeaway Food Services 5.7%, Legal and Accounting Services 4.7%, Auxiliary Finance and Investment Services 3.9%, Computer System Design and Related Services 3.4% and Hospitals 3.4%. We’re drowning in caffeine!
  11. The median weekly individual income for persons aged 15 years and over who were usual residents was $784, compared with $466 in Australia. The median weekly household income was $1,374, compared with $1,027 in Australia. The median weekly family income was $2,004, compared with $1,171 in Australia.
  12. There were 2,430 families in Surry Hills (Suburb): 14.3% were couple families with children, 72.3% were couple families without children, 8.2% were one parent families and 5.3% were other families. “Other families” – hmmm. Nationally that stands at 1.7%.
  13. There were 7,927 occupied private dwellings counted in Surry Hills (Suburb): 1.2% were separate houses, 24.5% were semi-detached, row or terrace houses, townhouses etc, 73.0% were flats, units or apartments and 1.3% were other dwellings.
  14. In Surry Hills (Suburb), the median weekly rent was $335, compared to $190 in Australia. The median monthly housing loan repayment was $2,104, compared to $1,300 in Australia. The average household size was 1.8 and the average number of persons per bedroom was 1.2. (The mind does boggle on that last one. Nationally there are 1.1 persons per bedroom.)
  15. In Surry Hills (Suburb), 8.8% of occupied private dwellings were fully owned, 16.7% were being purchased and 48.0% were rented. 27.2% rent nationally.
  16. In the 2006 Census in Surry Hills (Suburb), 30.6% of occupied private dwellings were family households, 33.0% were lone person households and 12.0% were group households. Lone nationally is 22.9% and group 3.7%.
  17. In Surry Hills (Suburb), of the occupied private dwellings being rented, 64.3% were rented from a real estate agent, 17.8% were rented from a State or Territory housing authority and 16.4% were rented from other landlord type. In comparison, in Australia 50.5% were rented from a real estate agent and 14.9% from a state or territory housing authority.

Of course you may visit Surry Hills on Ninglun’s Specials.

* 2010 is the post code for Surry Hills, not a year…

 
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Posted by on October 30, 2008 in Australia, Australia and Australian, local, multicultural Australia, Surry Hills

 

On translation

Without being in the slightest bit patronising or, worse, racist one can be amused at some of the mangled English that comes one’s way in translated text. We should always keep in mind this isn’t a one-way street either; it isn’t just a case of funny foreigners doing appalling things with English. There is a deadly serious side to the issue as well, as anything from international relations to running a business may be affected. And religion. I recall many years back an anecdote told by a missionary about a preacher working in a tonal language who told his congregation they should look forward to Heaven because when they got there their trousers would be removed. He had meant to say “burdens” but used the wrong tone. Similarly, I once ventured in Mandarin, a language I hardly speak at all, to introduce myself as a “dumpling” when I meant to say “teacher”. I believe Kevin Rudd is much less likely to make such errors.

All this to introduce a blog: Web-Translations.

The people there emailed English/ESL hoping for promotion, but it is a commercial rather than an educational site so I haven’t obliged. However, I thought I would mention it here. There are some nice stories there.

 
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Posted by on October 30, 2008 in diversions, education, English language, literacy, Multicultural, multiculturalism, other blogs, pluralism